Podcasts

The Humanities and Young Baltimoreans
Published in LA Weekly and Ms. Magazine, Baltimore native Jordannah Elizabeth returned home to teach after the Baltimore uprising. She talks about the impact of her mother instilling a love for reading at a young age, her love for the humanities, and their value for a young person in Baltimore City.
August 23, 2018 Jordannah Elizabeth
Exploring and Preserving African American History Through Dance
How can we trace cultural history through dance? What can dance tell us about belonging to a culture or nation? Breai Mason-Campbell from Guardian Baltimore, a dance cooperative that performs, preserves and passes on African American folk traditions, tells us more.
August 15, 2018 Breai Mason-Campbell
Humanism in Archaeology
We know archaeology connects us to the past, but how does it reveal the humanity of our ancestors? Jane Cox, Chief of Historic Preservation for Anne Arundel County and Board Member for the Lost Towns Project, an Anne Arundel County-based nonprofit and recent Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.
August 9, 2018 Jane Cox
Early Music in Western Maryland
Did you know that bluegrass has origins outside of the United States? Pat Nordstrom from Mountainside Baroque, an early music collective based in Western Maryland and Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.
July 26, 2018 Pat Nordstrom
Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture
2016 National Medal of Arts honoree, Jack Whitten, is best known for his paintings. This may be because his sculptures have never been visible to the public until now. The sculptures — inspired by the materials and traditions of Africa and ancient Greece — are now on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art in the exhibition Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture. Kevin Tervala, the museum’s Associate Curator of African Art, tells us more about the artist and the exhibition.
July 19, 2018 Kevin Tervala
How Civic Engagement Shaped Laurel, Maryland
How can ordinary Marylanders bring about change in their region? “We The People: How Civic Engagement Has Shaped Laurel,” the current exhibit at the Laurel Museum, delves into this question. Ann Bennett, Executive Director of the Laurel Historical Society, tells us more about the exhibit.
July 12, 2018 Ann Bennett
Early Women of Maryland Architecture
In 1925, Harvard Graduate School of Design didn’t offer women graduate degrees in architecture, but Victorine du Pont Homsey completed a certificate program with the same curriculum and professors. The Early Women of Architecture in Maryland exhibit, now at Dorchester Center for the Arts, features du Pont Homsey and 11 other women. The exhibit was supported in part by a grant from Maryland Humanities in 2015. Jillian Storms, In 1925, Harvard Graduate School of Design didn’t offer women graduate degrees in architecture, but Victorine du Pont Homsey completed a certificate program with the same curriculum and professors. The Early Women of Architecture in Maryland exhibit, now at Dorchester Center for the Arts, features du Pont Homsey and 11 other women. Jillian Storms, recipient of The Baltimore Architecture Foundation's Roger Redden Award and Preservation Maryland's George T. Harrison Volunteer Award for her efforts curating the exhibit, tells us more about the work of Victorine du Pont Homsey and this summer’s related programming.
July 5, 2018 Jillian Storms
The First American Saint
Did you know that the first American Saint lived in Maryland, where she opened the first free Catholic School for girls in the United States? Helen Jahn from The National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton tells us more about the woman behind the sainthood.
June 28, 2018 Helen Jahn
Preserving Audiovisual History
Ever imagine that our own home movies could be collected and preserved for future generations to explore? Siobhan Hagan, president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive, tells us about the value of audiovisual preservation.
June 21, 2018 Siobhan Hagan
The Father of Modern Battlefield Medicine
Did you know that the very first use of an ambulance corps and medical triage in the United States occurred in Frederick, Maryland? Major Jonathan Letterman — called "The Father of Modern Battlefield Medicine" — instituted these essential medical practices during the Civil War’s Battle of Antietam. Jake Wynn of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine talks about battle’s impact on Frederick and Letterman’s influence on medicine.
June 14, 2018 Jake Wynn
Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit organization that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.
Maryland Humanities
108 West Centre Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-4565
(410) 685-0095
(410) 685-0795 fax
info@mdhumanities.org
Join the Conversation   TwitterFacebookYouTube
Featured Donor or Partner
Institute of Museum and Library Services logo