Get Inspired

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  • Girl in Line with Book
    Sharing the Love of Books Statewide

    Encouraging a love of reading and a deeper sense of community, One Maryland One Book is like a statewide book club. Every Marylander is invited to participate through one of the hundreds of events happening around the state.

  • Influencing the Future through the Past

    In a friendly competition, students in grades 6-12 immerse themselves in a facet of history that interests them by researching it in-depth and presenting it in a creative way.

  • A Spotlight of Maryland's Rich Heritage

    This unique cultural collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and Maryland Humanities brings high-quality traveling exhibitions to small communities across the state, who make locally focused companion exhibits.

  • Connecting Veterans Through Literature

    Veterans Book Groups aim to bring veterans of all eras together to talk about military experiences and returning to civilian life while providing an informal, supportive environment for discussion, spurred by the shared reading of literature.

  • Explore Baltimore Literary History

    A guided walking tour through Baltimore’s Mt. Vernon neighborhood visits the homes and haunts of some of our state’s literary legends, providing insights into the contexts and influences of their work.

  • Participants in Audience Reading
    Celebrating Books & Literary Heritage

    With our network of partners, MCFB develops and supports literary programs that promote and celebrate books, reading, libraries, Maryland writers, and the state’s literary heritage.

  • Sharing Stories, Building Community

    Maryland Humanities brings oral history training to schools and communities with Maryland Voices, an oral history project led by Maryland Humanities staff and trained oral historians.

See Our Latest

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LITERARY WALKING TOUR

Explore sites of interest in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon Cultural District on an upcoming Saturday. Learn more.

Events

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  • We were enabled to go into the community and get information from real people. Also, the assignment was pretty subjective so we were able to take it in any way we liked. We led the projects and each one is so different from the next.

    Standing Together: Veterans Oral History Project, student participant
  • “We were very proud to have been chosen to partner with the Maryland Humanities on this exhibit project. Small museums, such as ours…are generally not able to field programs of this scope. Maryland Humanities has truly given us an opportunity to bring a nationally recognized program to the City of Bowie and Prince Georges County and have made it easy to reach and stretch and accomplish something that we’ve never done before on this level in our small museum system. The support of Maryland Humanities both financially and professionally is invaluable to us.”

    Pam Williams ~ Belair Manison, City of Bowie Museums, Bowie, MD, Host Site, Museum on Main Street​
  • “[I liked] witnessing three leaders in American thought discuss important issues in illuminating ways.”

    Pulitzer 100 event attendee
  • “It was wonderful for us to be able to facilitate this occurrence for it demonstrated to key community stakeholders the power of our museum as an anchor in an old town that is working to draw people downtown and it demonstrated the value of working together on large initiatives.”

    ​Michael Dixon ~ The Historical Society of Cecil County, Elkton, MD, Host Site, Museum on Main Street
  • “I am far more aware of making sure my patients and their families have true informed consent. A misunderstanding of consent can have a huge negative impact on several generations. I never would have realized this without Literature & Medicine.”

    ​Literature & Medicine participant
  • “In a test-driven educational system, we can sometimes lose sight of what is important. Allowing students time to read and discuss literature can never be underestimated. I appreciate that Letters About Literature recognizes, promotes, and fosters the importance of literature by getting students to write to authors. This contest gives students the opportunity to really think about how a piece has impacted them. I know that the authors don’t necessarily read the letters addressed to them through the contest, but my students have often sent an additional copy of their letter to the author. The euphoria and excitement that comes over the kids who are lucky enough to have the author respond is heart-warming. Just this past year, a student of mine received a personal letter, an autographed book, and other items of appreciation from the author he wrote to.”

    ​Letters About Literature teacher
  • “A few years ago a student connected with a novel describing a family merging from two families that had been traumatized by divorce. Her own family was in the process of this same event. Because of her selection I was able to learn what she was going through. No other assignment would have been quite so helpful for revealing and honoring her feelings.”

    Letters About Literature teacher
  • “We were very impressed with the depth of research all the students did for their History Day projects. It was fun to see them interacting with each other during the competition and events.”

    Lori and Josh Skillman, History Day Parents
  • “[One Maryland One Book] taught me how much we need to talk and listen to one another.”

    One Maryland One Book 2016 participant
  • “History Day has taught men how to interpret and effective use primary sources in my writing to create and support claims. Now I am much more likely to explore databases, go to libraries, and explore further external sources for credible and effective sources.”

    Maryland History Day 2019 Student
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