Maryland Humanities Announces Next Stop on its Statewide Tour of Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition

March 27, 2017

THE WAY WE WORKED OPENS IN KENT COUNTY ON MARCH 31

(Baltimore) – Maryland Humanities is pleased to announce that its statewide tour of The Way We Worked, a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition, will move to its second stop in Chestertown on March 31. Sumner Hall (G.A.R. Post #25) will host the exhibition and along with its principal partner, Washington College’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, will feature companion exhibits and programming across the county highlighting Kent County’s work history.

The grand opening on March 31 will feature a reception and preview party honoring exhibition producers, organizers, sponsors, partners, elected officials, and community volunteers, as well as a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The preview party will be held from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the Sultana Education Foundation, located just two blocks away from Sumner Hall. The ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. on the front steps of Sumner Hall. After the ceremony, participants will be invited to preview the exhibition in small groups.

The companion exhibition at Sumner Hall, The Black Labor Experience in Kent County, will feature four displays:  (1) the Story of the Founders of Sumner Hall and the 471 African Americans who served with the Union forces during the Civil War;  (2) an exploration of the contribution of Free and Enslaved Labor in Kent County – from the Revolutionary War-era through the end of the 19th Century; (3) Tools of the Trades:  a display of traditional farm, fishing, household, and office “tools” used in Kent County; and (4) contemporary stories – Oral Work Histories  of Community Members.  There will also be a Kids Corner with hands-on activities for young children.

The C. V. Starr Center is also offering three special events:  (1) a keynote lecture by Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed:  On (Not) Getting By in America; (2) Choppin’ at the Shop  – an original multimedia work of music, the art of conversation, and photography as it relates to African Americans who work or have worked in Kent County; and (3) A Walk Through Working Chestertown.  In addition, more than fifteen other venues across the county are hosting exhibits, lectures, and programs celebrating workers in the community.

Nina Johnson, executive director of Sumner Hall, said:  “Hosting this exhibition has given us a unique opportunity to explore the rich history of the way we have worked in our communities across Kent County.   The Museum on Main Street project has allowed our community to come together in creative ways to identify individual stories and to document them. It has been a rewarding experience to see how our collaboration with Washington College, the Kent County Public Schools, the Historical Society of Kent County, the Sultana Educational Foundation, the Museums of Kent, the Kent County Public Library, and other local organizations and businesses has resulted in an exciting menu of educational and cultural programs across the county. While we are proud of all these offerings, our companion exhibition that showcases the contributions of Kent County African American workers from the 1650s to the present is especially important. The Way We Worked initiative has truly been a ‘win-win’ experience for everyone!”

“We’re delighted to bring The Way We Worked to five small communities across the state and celebrate Maryland’s diverse and engaging work history, from the paper and steel mills of the 19th Century to the technology boom of today. We hope you’ll join us in exploring the rich local history unearthed through each community’s companion exhibit and programming,” said Phoebe Stein, executive director of Maryland Humanities.

The Way We Worked will be on view at Sumner Hall March 31–May 20, 2017. Sumner Hall is located at 206 South Queen Street in Chestertown, Maryland. Learn more at sumnerhall.org.

THE WAY WE WORKED BRINGS THE SMITHSONIAN TO MARYLAND COMMUNITIES

The Way We Worked is the fifth Museum on Main Street (MoMS) project brought to our state by Maryland Humanities.  The traveling exhibition, adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives, explores how work became such a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years. The exhibition draws from the Archives’ rich collections to tell this compelling story. Each host site develops a companion exhibit and educational programs for their communities for a seven-week period that tells their local work story.

Local host sites unearth stories and develop community partnerships to bring the Smithsonian traveling exhibition to life through the lens of their own community history.

 

The Way We Worked Maryland Tour

February 3–March 24, 2017 Western Maryland Heritage Association, Cumberland, Allegany County
March 31–May 20, 2017 Sumner Hall (G.A.R. Post 15), Chestertown, Kent County
May 26–July 15, 2017 Carroll County Farm Museum, Westminster, Carroll County
July 21­­–September  9, 2017 Brunswick Heritage Museum, Brunswick, Frederick County
September 15–November 4, 2017 Salisbury University Art Galleries, Salisbury, Wicomico County

 

About Museum on Main Street
The Way We Worked has been made possible in Maryland by Maryland Humanities. The Way We Worked is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and State Humanities Councils nationwide.  The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service  brings high-quality traveling exhibits to small communities through their own Main Street museums, historical societies, and other cultural venues.  Residents enthusiastically engage with exhibition content, and diverse community members come together to share and celebrate their heritage. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United States Congress.

 

Maryland Humanities is a statewide nonprofit organization that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities. For more information, visit www.mdumanities.org. Maryland Humanities is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the State of Maryland, private foundations, corporations, small businesses, and individual donors.

Press Release
Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit organization that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.
Maryland Humanities
108 West Centre Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-4565
(410) 685-0095
(410) 685-0795 fax
info@mdhumanities.org
Join the Conversation   TwitterFacebookYouTube
Featured Donor or Partner
M&T Bank logo