Podcasts

B&O Railroad
Baltimore and the B&O Railroad
How did the B&O Railroad affect the entire course of Baltimore’s economic growth? Matt Crenson, professor emeritus at Johns Hopkins University and author of an upcoming book on the political history of Baltimore, tells us more.
January 6, 2017 Matt Crenson
Abraham Joshua Heschel and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
A Season for Resolutions – Abraham Joshua Heschel and Forgiveness
What will you resolve to change in the New Year? In the second of our two-part series with the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies, scholar Benjamin Sax tells us about Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel and his philosophy on forgiveness.
December 30, 2016 Ben Sax
Dorothy Day
A Season of Giving: Dorothy Day and the Undeserving Poor
As the end of the year approaches, many of us consider donating to charities and nonprofits. In the first of a two-part series from the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies, executive director Heather Miller-Rubens tells us about Dorothy Day, a religious leader who offered a powerful meditation on giving.
December 22, 2016 Heather Miller-Rubens
Samuel Collins and Matthew Durington
Networked Anthropology
How have smartphones and our constant connectivity changed the way we travel- and the way we relate to one another through the places we visit? Towson University anthropology professors Samuel Collins and Matthew Durington tell us how their research led them to the new idea of “networked anthropology.”
December 16, 2016 Samuel Collins and Matthew Durington
Amy Froide
Britain's First Female Investors
What role did women play in England’s financial revolution in the 17th and 18th Century? Amy Froide, Acting Chair and Associate Professor of History at UMBC and author of an upcoming book on the subject, tells us about some of the pioneering female investors and brokers of the era.
December 9, 2016 Amy Froide
100 years of the Pulitzer Prizes.
Pulitzer 100
This year marks the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes, and Maryland Humanities has been celebrating with a yearlong series of events highlighting the impact this award-winning work has had on our lives. In partnership with the University of Maryland, we wrap up the series on December 6th at 7 p.m. with WORLDWISE Arts & Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: The Pulitzer 100, featuring Pulitzer-Prize winning author-historians Taylor Branch and Isabel Wilkerson in conversation, moderated by Sherrilyn Ifill, at the Clarice in College Park. Here to tell us more is Director of the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy at the University of Maryland College Park, Dr. Sheri Parks.
December 2, 2016 Sheri Parks
A Feast for the Senses
What was life like in the Middle Ages in Europe? A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe, a new exhibition from the Walters Art Museum sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, depicts the human experience of that time through hundreds of life-inspired works of art. Joaneath Spicer, acting curator of the exhibition, tells us more.
November 18, 2016 Joaneath Spicer
Silvia Golombek
Public Libraries as the New Commons
Placemaking is the idea of utilizing a community’s local assets in order to create quality public spaces that contribute to the well-being of the community and create a sense of belonging through place. Silvia Blitzer Golombek, a nonprofit consultant and secretary of the Board of Maryland Humanities, shares how public libraries serve as such spaces for local communities.
November 14, 2016 Silvia Golombek
Ariosto’s epic 16th century Italian poem, Orlando furioso.
Classics in the Modern Age
The enduring value of classic literature lies in its exploration of the human condition and also its ability for modern interpretation. Can today’s students in our modern world relate to classics that were written centuries before their time? Towson University Professor John McLucas provides this reflection on a recent class on Ariosto’s epic 16th century Italian poem, Orlando furioso.
November 4, 2016 John McLucas
Chris Nelson, President of St. John's College in Annapolis.
The First Folio of Shakespeare
To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 1616, the Folger Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities are bringing the First Folio of Shakespeare to one site in every state. With support from Maryland Humanities, St. John’s College is hosting the Folio in Maryland from November 1–December 4. Christopher Nelson, President of St. John’s College, tells us why the First Folio is so important.
October 28, 2016 Christopher Nelson
Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit organization that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.
Maryland Humanities
108 West Centre Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-4565
(410) 685-0095
(410) 685-0795 fax
info@mdhumanities.org
Join the Conversation   TwitterFacebookYouTube
Featured Donor or Partner
The Nora Roberts Foundation logo